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Effect of online dating on society

effect of online dating on society-63

This allows mothers to distinguish their chicks from parasitic chicks.Sexual imprinting is the process by which a young animal learns the characteristics of a desirable mate.

effect of online dating on society-54effect of online dating on society-18

Lorenz demonstrated how incubator-hatched geese would imprint on the first suitable moving stimulus they saw within what he called a "critical period" between 13–16 hours shortly after hatching.The filial imprinting of birds was a primary technique used to create the movie Winged Migration (Le Peuple Migrateur), which contains a great deal of footage of migratory birds in flight.The birds imprinted on handlers, who wore yellow jackets and honked horns constantly.It is most obvious in nidifugous birds, which imprint on their parents and then follow them around.It was first reported in domestic chickens, by the 19th-century amateur biologist Douglas Spalding.It commonly occurs in falconry birds reared from hatching by humans. When an imprint must be bred from, the breeder lets the male bird copulate with his head while he is wearing a special hat with pockets on to catch the male bird's semen.

Then he courts a suitable imprint female bird (including offering food, if it is part of that species's normal courtship).

This phenomenon, known as the Westermarck effect, was first formally described by Finnish anthropologist Edvard Westermarck in his book The History of Human Marriage (1891).

The Westermarck effect has since been observed in many places and cultures, including in the Israeli kibbutz system, and the Chinese Shim-pua marriage customs, as well as in biological-related families.

One example is London Zoo female giant panda Chi Chi.

When taken to Moscow Zoo for mating with the male giant panda An An, she refused his attempts to mate with her, but made a full sexual self-presentation to a Russian zookeeper.

Birds that are hatched in captivity have no mentor birds to teach them their traditional migratory routes. The chicks hatched under the wing of his glider, and imprinted on him. The young birds followed him not only on the ground (as with Lorenz) but also in the air as he took the path of various migratory routes.