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Korea dating culture

korea dating culture-50

For example, I-um started in 2010 targeting at 20’s and 30’s singles.It charges membership fee of 80,000 won and claims to have a total of one million registered members.

For the purpose of booking, waiters may maintain lists of attractive women’s phone numbers and will call them up and offer free, or very cheap, tables and drinks for them and their friends.Social Dating Service Applications With widespread usage of smartphones in South Korea, social dating service applications (“SDS app”) have been developed since late 2009 to help arrange blind dates for the people.The SDS app helps you find the best match after you have input information about the type of person you would like to meet.Meeting (미팅) If your Korean friend tells you that he/she is going to a “미팅” (same pronunciation as the English word “meeting”), it doesn’t mean that he/she is going to a meeting to discuss work or study-related issues.In South Korea, “meeting” refers to group dating of singles and is a favourite dating method of the younger generations.They are assigned a waiter who, in return for a tip from the men, go around the other tables to find a group of women whom they bring over to the men’s table.

Usually, the larger the tip, the prettier the women he will bring.

If one finds someone he/she likes, they will exchange the contact details and start dating.

In a meeting, the most attractive man who is able to gain the attention of most women is called “킹카” (pronunced as “King-Ka”) which literally means the”King card”.

Once the conversation is finished, with mutual agreement from the parties, the profile pictures and phone numbers are exchanged between the parties.

Booking (부킹) “Booking” (부킹) is a method more suitable for adults since it takes place in a traditional Korean night-club.

However, traditional Korean night-clubs are different from the Western ones – there are rows of tables for patrons to sit down and chat and a relatively small dance floor since patrons in fact do not go there to dance.