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Pros of dating in high school

Some children however, hate the idea of going to a new private school when their friends are all going to be moving to a state secondary school together.

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This emotional bond couples share is a good outlet for relieving some of the stress that comes from daily life.Click through the slideshow below for 10 reasons to enjoy your current life as part of a non-couple -- and feel free to re-visit this every time you find yourself thinking, "OMG WHY AM I STILL SINGLE?When trying to decide between private and state schools, the most obvious drawback of going private is the fees you need to pay each year.Relationships offer a person the comfort of being with someone.Having someone to turn to as a best friend lets one maintain a strong friendship and simply enjoy the physical company of his or her significant other.If you live in a close-knit community where children often play out together you could find that your child “loses” friends because they no longer have school in common.

And if friends from their new school live some distance away you will face a long round trip to take them to friends’ houses.

A parent may have had multiple children through the school and therefore reaps certain privileges in line with the amount of fees they have paid. It teaches children early on that life is (unjustly) unfair, that winning depends on factors outside of achievement and only furthers the accumulation of arrogance from an uneven playing field.

The parent may offer discounted services (accounting, cheap marquees, even surgery(! There is no higher body to complain to other than OFSTED, where the individual complaints look small and petty but only when accumilated, show a marked and obvious inbalance of dated 'old boys' network' values. I will not consider private for secondary as a result. With regards to your article on the pros and cons of private education, I think it is very important to include the fact that nepotism can play a very large part.

On the plus side, if your child is a high achiever, you might find that they rise to the challenge of a class which has many academic “stars” and put in more effort than they would do in a school of mixed ability.

But if your child is academically average then their confidence could take a knock at a selective independent school.

Computers may be dated or children may not have access to them as regularly as they would do in the state sector.