skip to content »

extremedivision.ru

Male dating reality shows

male dating reality shows-15

What followed would become an MTV signature: scripted dating shows that favored hot (often shirtless, fit and on Spring Break) 20-somethings look for the someone to screw, not marry.The clever set ups — blind dates in bedrooms, blind dates in vans, blind dates with parents — kept generations of teens glued to the channel, much in the same way music videos had the decade prior.

hard already whetted the network’s appetite for hot young singles getting it on and audiences were ready for more.If two women chose the same guy, he got to pick between them—turning the tables and giving us the drama we craved oh, so much.Prioritizing personality over looks, covered the faces of the 20 bachelors one lucky woman was to choose from.That was the concept behind —effectively increasing the awkwardness of the blind date tenfold.An unlucky man and woman were paired to go out whilst their former flames chatted via earpiece, guiding the conversation and live-narrating the interaction. Also known as the story of my life, featured a double date with one extraneous factor: another human.As icky as that might sound, in a perverse way, you have to give the show credit.

At least it foregrounded a gay man trying to find love, instead of using gay men as humorous accessories—or potential roadblocks in the path of straight contestants.

Touting premises like chaining love interests together and offering contestants the chance to date fake Prince Harry, many of these shows carried promise.

But most of them met the same swift TV demise, eventually.

The fifth wheel didn't serve much purpose outside of being a provocateur, and rarely had an effect on whether love blossomed between the contestants.

Halfway through the double date, the contestants would switch partners.

Tuesday brings great news for reality-TV junkies everywhere—or, at least, the ones who get Logo TV in their cable subscriptions. Consider some bygone reality dating shows that featured gay contestants, and you’ll quickly understand why this matters. umbrella know what it’s like to be rendered virtually invisible—or, perhaps worse, to only be seen through the lens of stereotypes ascribed to them by straight people.